3 Reasons To Keep A Rooster In Your Flock

I’m absolutely in love with having a few roosters in my flock. If you live in an area where roosters are allowed, I want to persuade you to keep one in your flock too. Here are the top 3 reasons why I keep a rooster around (or three!).

3-great-reasons-to-keep-a-rooster-in-your-flock

1. Flock watchdog

Perhaps the most important role of the rooster is the job of keeping his eye on the sky and around the perimeter for any potential threats. A watchful rooster can be invaluable for sounding the alarm when he notices a predator or other threat. Roosters have different calls they use to say different things. If you spend any length of time watching your flock, you will learn the different calls a rooster has to communicate with the hens.

2. Fertile eggs for hatching new chicks

My second favorite reason for having a rooster in my flock is the possibility of hatching out some chicks of my own. When I have a favorite hen that lays a great egg color or is a particularly high producer of good quality eggs, I have the ability to hatch some of her chicks to try to perpetuate those genetics.

3-great-reasons-to-keep-a-rooster-in-your-flock

3. Fewer issues with “mean girl” flock drama

Flocks with roosters in charge tend to have fewer pecking order issues. Yes, keeping more than one rooster in a flock means you will have the potential of some serious rooster fights, but if you watch closely, there will be a dominant rooster with his preferred hens, and then the other roosters with their preferred hens. As long as there is plenty of space for each sub-flock to have their own areas, a large flock with several roosters is not usually an issue. I currently have 3 roosters with 75 hens and everyone gets along peacefully.

I hope you will consider having a rooster in your flock. If you are unsure which breed to add to your flock, be sure to take a look at our blog on the friendliest rooster breeds. You won’t regret adding one, as they are handsome, important leaders in a flock and serve a purpose. What kind of rooster do you have in your flock?  Tell us about him in the comments below!

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